Motor City Radio Flashbacks

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A ’60S MOTOR CITY MUSIC HAPPENING RECALLED: ’66!

August 12th, 2016

Motor City Radio Flashbacks logo (MCRFB)A ’60s Detroit Music Moment Recalled: 1966

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DetroitFreePress

FROM THE BACK-PAGES OF THE DETROIT FREE PRESS

 

DETROIT  Thursday, March 24, 1966 Nick Londes, general manager of Olympia Stadium, said Wednesday that he is attempting to bring the Beatles to Detroit for an appearance at Olympia around mid-August. (MORE see article below) . . . .

— THE DETROIT FREE PRESS


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A ’60S MOTOR CITY MUSIC HAPPENING RECALLED: ’66!

August 12th, 2016

Motor City Radio Flashbacks logo (MCRFB)A ’60s Detroit Music Moment Recalled: 1966

 

 

 

 

 

 

DetroitFreePress

FROM THE BACK-PAGES OF THE DETROIT FREE PRESS

 

DETROIT Saturday, April 9, 1966 The mailbags being carted into Olympia’s ticket office point to an astonishing verdict: The Beatles, due at Olympia for two performances August 13, are more popular now than in their earlier appearances in Detroit. (MORE see article below) . . . .

— THE DETROIT FREE PRESS


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A ’60S MOTOR CITY MUSIC HAPPENING RECALLED: ’66!

August 12th, 2016

Motor City Radio Flashbacks logo (MCRFB)A ’60s Detroit Music Moment Recalled: 1966

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DetroitFreePress

FROM THE BACK-PAGES OF THE DETROIT FREE PRESS

 

DETROIT Friday, August 12, 1966 Anyone still inside a yellow submarine on Saturday instead of Olympia Stadium will be missing the biggest show to hit Detroit this year. (MORE see ‘WHERE THE ACTION IS‘ article below) . . . .

— THE DETROIT FREE PRESS


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SHANNON’S SPOT LIVE ON CKLW-TV . . . OCTOBER 5, 1968

August 11th, 2016

Motor City Radio Flashbacks logoFrom the MCRFB NEWS archive: 1968

Popular Big 8 Jock Finds Place On Local TV Dance Show

 

 

 

 

CKLW Tom Shannon 1967

CKLW Tom Shannon 1967

DETROIT — “The Lively Spot,” hosted by CKLW deejay Tom Shannon, bowed here on CKLW-TV (Channel 9) September 30 replacing the Robin Seymour “Swingin’ Time” show.

The show will be seen 3:30-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 6-7 p.m. Saturday when it will be known as “The Tom Shannon Show.”

Shannon will continue his popular 6-9 p.m. CKLW-AM show on the radio. Elmer Jaspan, director of programming for CKLW-TV, predicts Shannon will became a great favorite of Detroit young people on local Detroit/Windsor (Canada) television.

Shannon joined CKLW four years ago. A songwriter, he wrote the 1963 hit, “Wild Weekend,” while a jock in Buffalo. He also wrote “Soul Clappin,” a local hit now currently playing Detroit radio. END

Tom Shannon Show on CKLW TV-9; TV Guide ad March-22-28-1969

Tom Shannon Show on CKLW TV-9; TV Guide March-22-28-1969

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(Information and news source: Billboard; October 5, 1968)

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DRAKE BLASTS RECORD MEN LABELING HIM TIGHT-PLAY ADDICT . . . AUGUST 12, 1967

August 10th, 2016

Motor City Radio Flashbacks logo (MCRFB)From the MCRFB NEWS archive: 1967

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW YORK — Bill Drake, programming consultant who has just been hired to guide all of the RKO General radio stations, lashed out at the record men who would tag him with the image of a tight playlist addict.

RKO General 1962-1991 BW logo (mcrfb)Drake, who scored ratings successes with both KFRC in San Francisco and KHJ in Los Angeles, was in New York last week trying to work his magic on an FM station – WOR-FM, a stereo operation that had already made a sizable dent in New York ratings with a rock ‘n’ roll format.

One of the first moves of Drake was to install Gary Mack, formerly of KHJ, as program director of the station, replacing Art Wander.

As for other changes in the station, Drake said he would try to improve the presentation of the music and the content. “The station will continue to play a lot of diverse album music, aiming at the 18 -35 age group. It’s going to be rock, using every type of LP cut. Oldies would have a lot of influence, a lot of Motown product, for example.”

He said that other stations under his banner had been playing album cuts, “but to take an album and put it in the control room and say the deejay can play from it is the same fallacy a lot of stations make in saying that Sinatra is a super star. You don’t play Sinatra for the sake of Sinatra; he’s had some bad cuts, too. You don’t play Dylan for the sake of Dylan, Sinatra for the sake of Sinatra, Motown for the sake of Motown.

“The object is to play the good Dylan, the good Sinatra,” he said. And a lot can determine this. People working at the various stations guided by Drake listen to every cut of every LP, every single. Drake credits his success to “hard work and the good people working with me.”

Swap Information

Information between the stations is exchanged in writing, there are conference telephone calls on the music itself, they all exchange playlists. “But the music lists at various stations vary an awful lot. This actually gives us the opportunity, contrary to opinion, to expose and test nine times as many records as anyone else. If a radio station plays three new different records each week that the other stations are not playing, this would run to 27 new records each week.”

Basically, he felt his radio station policy isn’t just to play the top few records. . . but he does advocate not playing “losing” records. “The object is to play winners. Its good for us, it’s good for the record companies. If you have a weak record on the air, it’s obviously going to limit the amount of exposure you can give a strong record.

“I could never understand why record companies wouldn’t be irritated because their good product was being hurt by the amount of weak product sometimes played.”

Fresh Product

Drake does believe definitely in playing new records, saying his stations were spinning LP cuts by the Jefferson Airplane before the group hit pay-dirt with the single. “You’ve always got to have fresh new product on the air, good new records. . . whether by a new or known artists. Otherwise your station winds up with a staleness.”

Playing records by and for the hippies will not lead to a successful radio station, he felt; he believes the whole of San Francisco movement is a myth. Request radio is also too narrowly aimed . . . “what’s wrong is that these stations get the teen-tween listeners. You want them, too, but not exclusively. Younger kids are the only ones, however, who have the time and patience to dial. They aren’t going anywhere anyway.”

The object of winning radio is to please everybody without going after them. “You play ‘Happy Together’ by the Turtles. ‘You Keep Me Hanging On’ by the Supremes. . . those are monster records that everybody likes.”

Still, aside from the “monster” policy, Drake’s stations do have some leeway. Tom Rounds, he said, picked up on “Ode To Billy Joe” early and began playing
it under the assumption it was going to become a monster.

The record hit the chart a week ago like gangbusters and it’s still climbing. So, obviously, is Drake. END

(Information and news source: Billboard; August 12, 1967)

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RKO GENERAL BILL DRAKE Radio Consultant

RKO GENERAL BILL DRAKE Radio Consultant


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