Motor City Radio Flashbacks

Memories From the Soundtrack of Your Life

THIS MEMORIAL DAY. REMEMBERING ALL WHO SERVED

May 29th, 2017
Steve Allen Smith Great Lakes Memorial Cemetary, Holly, MI

IN REMEMBRANCE

IN OBSERVANCE. A LEE ALAN MEMORIAL DAY SPECIAL

May 29th, 2017

MEMORIAL DAY * Lee Alan * LEE ALAN CREATIVE PRODUCTIONS

MCRFB.COM Logo (2)

IN REMEMBRANCE OF SWINGIN’ SWEENEY. 05/25/2017

May 26th, 2017

* Frank ” Swingin’ ” Sweeney *

IN MEMORY

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Late last night, Motor City Radio Flashbacks received sad word Frank “Swingin'” Sweeney passed away, yesterday, May 25, in New York City. He was 83.

In tribute to the WKNR legacy of Frank Sweeney please visit Keener13 com.Remembering “Swingin'” Sweeney

On October 31, 2013, Frank Sweeney reflects his memories of WKNR for the 50th year on the birth of Keener 13. You can listen to Frank Sweeney (audio @ 10:09 to 16:13) in this Motor City Radio Flashbacks aircheck HERE.

Photo: Frank Sweeney with Gary Stevens, Novi, MI., April 25, 1998


IN REMEMBRANCE OF TED CLARK. DECEMBER 25, 2015

May 26th, 2017

* Ted Clark *

IN MEMORY

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In February of this year, Motor City Radio Flashbacks received word, having been confirmed by his daughter, Patricia, from Illinois, Ted Clark (real name Alva Phillips) passed away on December 25, 2015. He was 84.

For more on the WKNR legacy of Ted Clark visit keener13.com.


RADIOMEN MAP CLEAN-UP BATTLE VS DIRTY RECORDS . . . APRIL 8, 1967

May 25th, 2017

From the MCRFB NEWS Archive: 1967

Broadcasters To Hold Private Session Amid National Association of Broadcasters Meet April 2-5

 

 

 

 

CHICAGO – Broadcasters will hold private meetings here Sunday to Wednesday (April 2 -5) during the National Association of Broadcasters‘ convention seeking some method of eliminating or censoring pornographic lyrics on records.

At present, two different factions are working on the same objective. One is headed by the McLendon Stations, who are calling for printed lyrics of both sides of every record submitted to their six music stations. The chain will refuse to play records sent without lyric sheets and refuse consideration of both sides of a record if one side is considered in bad taste.

This would have hurt “Ruby Tuesday” by the Rolling Stones, a big hit, because the flip side “Let’s Spend the Night Together” stirred up a national fuss.

The other radio faction is being headed by Harry Availl, general manager of WEAM in Washington. He said he had “half a dozen” stations lined up who have expressed strong interest in some method of avoiding the “dirty lyric” problem.

Averill said he will be meeting (no official connection with the NAB convention) with other station managers at the NAB to “formulate and pursue aggressively some system” of control.

He, too, wants to see lyrics. “Today, the records have to be watched very carefully,” he said. “We don’t want to be involved in any restraint of trade situation, so we’ll also be discussing this matter with our lawyers. But I think all the better operators in the top 25 markets will be involved in our campaign.”

Recently, several stations have refused to play records featuring even a suggestion of bad taste. One Hot 100 format station recently taped backward a possible suggestive line so listeners wouldn’t understand it on the air. END

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(Information and news source: Billboard; April; 8, 1967)



ANTI-SMUT MCLENDON TO SET UP A ‘FRINGE’ PANEL . . . MAY 20, 1967

May 25th, 2017

From the MCRFB NEWS archive: 1967

Gordon McLendon “Lyric-Seeking” Panel Seek To Weed Out Suggestive Records

 

 

 

 

NEW YORKGordon McLendon, president of the McLendon radio chain, is going to set up a lyric-testing panel of “prostitutes, ex-prostitutes, junkies and ex-addicts” to assist in weeding out suggestive records. This is the latest declaration McLendon has made in his campaign against “filth” in the music-record industry.

The chain has set May 15 (this was published in an April 8 Billboard advertisement) as the deadline by which all record companies will have to provide printed lyrics with new records or stand the risk of not having them played on the air. McLendon is seeking to carry this campaign to every radio station in the nation and, so far, is riding a groundswell of enthusiasm, especially at the grassroots level, but also from major stations and broadcasting chains.

The success of the nationwide purge, he admitted in an exclusive interview, “depends on the support of other radio stations throughout the country. If joined by other important stations – and some have already joined – then the irresponsible element of the record industry we’re concerned about will have to co-operate.”

But, regardless, the current wave of records featuring sex-suggestive lyrics or lyrics pushing dope brought him to the point “where I couldn’t live with myself. Not because I was aware of doing anything wrong, but because I felt we were not policing the music satisfactorily.” McLendon said that his national program director, Bill Stewart, had suggested attempting to interest the radio industry in a voluntary crusade.

To combat “hippy” phrases in many of the lyrics in question on today’s records. McLendon last Saturday began work on his unusual lyric-testing panel –“five to seven people of different backgrounds, maybe a prostitute, an ex-prostitute, a junkie, an ex-addict.”

On any lyric found difficult to understand, he said the chain would telephone one of the panel members and read the lyric to them. “Best we can do, then, is say the lyrics are probably all right if they pass our informal jury.”

Questioned about the possibility of providing a “dictionary of hip slang” to his stations – which include KLIF in Dallas, WYSL in Buffalo, N. Y., and KILT in Houston – McLendon felt this would not help because teen slang changes so rapidly, “almost by the week.”

Moral Obligation

But he felt a moral responsibility to do something constructive and do it quick. “I’ve just come back from Sweden and they are having a serious problem with marijuana.” Use of marijuana is common, he said, even at the 8 and 9-year old level. It’s a “desperate situation.”

He said he didn’t want to pose as an authority on marijuana, “because I’m not, But it is the first step toward the really hard stuff.” He felt this allegory could be also put forth toward smutty records; “maybe this will be the first breakdown for the morals of teens and sub-teens in the United States.” Kids, he felt, begin their really first contact with the adult world through listening to radio and watching youth shows on TV. If this first contact makes drugs and illicit sex attractive, “we’ve been just as guilty as those who do the pushing of drugs. I feel very strongly about this.”

How strongly is evident by the fact that he taped a Mike Wallace show last Wednesday attacking dirty lyrics and earlier that day delivered a speech before the national convention of the American Mothers Committee at the Waldorf- Astoria here, in which he said, “The McLendon radio stations will not air records that offend public morals, dignity or taste either innocently or intentionally. We’ve had all we can stand of the record industry’s glorifying marijuana, LSD, and sexual activity. The newest Beatles record, out next week, has a line of 40,000 purple  hearts in one arm. Is that what you want your children to listen to? I certainly don’t think so.”

One of the new songs mentioned in his speech was “Try It,” by The Standells. McLendon urged members: “When you go back to your own communities, let your radio stations know that you are behind this campaign.” He called for “a rather updated version of the Boston Tea Party. Two centuries later, now, I suppose we might call it The Wax Party – one in which we urge all the distasteful English records that deal with sex, sin and drugs (this is not to say the British music or record industry is the only offender).

At the same time, I think it is past the time that we made an attempt to stop whatever few irresponsible elements of the British music and record industry there are in existence from influencing our children with their double ententes and, in some instances, single ententes of unmistakable meaning.”

On the Mike Wallace show, McLendon said, “I think we’re going to get badly hurt by this stand because we’re never going to know from what direction the attacks will be coming. It’s unfortunate that a great deal of the opposition will be like germ warfare, because you could scarcely expect the people to come out and insist they be given the right to continue recording filth.”

He told Billboard that, “I’ve got to ban these records … or be called a liar by the radio industry.” Quite a number of the records the station would be banning, he said, might get played on other radio stations and be high on their charts. He said that McLendon stations might even suffer in ratings because of not playing these records. “Being a practical businessman, I had to think of this. But I said, ‘Let her rip!’ and that’s what we are going to do.” For six months or more to come, he felt the broadcasting chain would find all types of bugs in policing the music and “some elements of the standards we’ve so pragmatically set will have to change, but I think this is, at least, the beginning of what could be something very, very good. We’re going to be working on this.” END

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(Information and news source: Billboard; May 20, 1967)


TWO TOP RADIO EXECUTIVES. Don Burden with Gordon McLendon (R) in this press photo from 1967. (Click on images for largest view)


UP FOR REGIONAL EMMY AWARD NOMINATION! JUNE 2017: ‘J. P. – THE VOICE OF DETROIT’

May 23rd, 2017

NEWS RELEASE JRT Agency (a.)


NEWS RELEASE JRT Agency (b.)


A MCRFB NOTE: ABOVE AFOREMENTIONED LINKS ACTIVATED BELOW

— (second and last paragraph; pg. b.)

The documentary originally aired on DPTV in 2016 and was shown again on St. Patrick’s Day 2017. The film can currently be streamed online via DPTV Passport or ordered through the website here.

About the JRT Agency

The JRT Agency is a marketing communications firm that is pioneering an industry revolution as Creative Scientists. Driven by the power of everyday invention, this unique group of talented individuals is known for its strategic, cost-effective solutions to tough client challenges. JRT’s client base ranges across multiple verticals encompassing both B2B and B2C communications.  These include, but are not limited to: automotive, energy, food and beverage, historical organizations, and consumer goods. For more information visit: www.thejrtagency.com.


JAMIE McCARTHY, son of the legendary Detroit WJR morning radio personality, is pictured here interviewed by Fred Nahhat (left) for the 2016 Detroit public television showing of ‘J. P. – The Voice of Detroit.’ Nahhat, co-executive producer of the film, is also senior VP Production for Detroit Public Television. (Photo credit: JRT Agency; photo click on image 2x for largest image size)


THE LEGENDARY WJR morning man, the late J. P. McCarthy circa 1965. (Photo credit: JRT Agency; click on image 2x for largest image size)


ABOUT THIS JRT AGENCY NEWS RELEASE

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Motor City Radio Flashbacks would like to express our congratulations to DPTV, Jamie McCarthy and Fred Nahhat, for their recent Emmy nomination for their Detroit Public Television broadcast (2016) film, ‘J. P. – The Voice of Detroit. The film was made possible by Detroit Public Television (DPTV) and was created and produced by DPTV’s very own Jamie McCarthy, son of J. P. McCarthy. Co-producced by Fred Nahhat.

This prestigious media award, formally known as the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Regional Emmy Awards, will be presented on June 10, 2017, at the Motor City Casino Sound Board, in Detroit.

Motor City Radio Flashbacks is honored to reach out to our great Detroit broadcasting community in extending further awareness for this outstanding film and of its nomination.

This film is not just only a tribute to J.P. McCarthy, but it is also a tribute of a Detroit community who came to love and embrace the broadcast legend for three decades — tuning in to the “voice of Detroit” mornings on 760 WJR.

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For more information on this film, please contact:

Heidi R. Hedquist
Chief Executive Officer
Cause & Effect Marketing

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Thank you, Heidi Hedquist, for sharing this special new release with Motor City Radio Flashbacks.


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PRESS IMAGES FROM DETROIT RADIO’S PAST! WJR 1970

May 23rd, 2017

WJR-760 AM J. P. McCarthy 1970 (Press Photo; click on image for largest view)


PRESS IMAGES FROM DETROIT RADIO’S PAST! WJR 1979

May 23rd, 2017

WJR-760 AM J. P. McCarthy 1979 (Press Photo; click on image for largest view)


MOTOWN ARTISTS SNAPSHOT! BRENDA HOLLOWAY ’67

May 22nd, 2017

BRENDA HOLLOWAY circa 1967. A resident living in Los Angeles at the time, You’ve Made Me So Very Happy was recorded at Nashville West Studio in L.A. “You’ve Made Me…” peaked at #39 on Billboard on November 4, 1967. Spending 10 weeks on the charts, the song would be the last single Brenda Holloway would record for Motown Records. Two years later, a cover version of this song was released by Blood, Sweat and Tears. And their version would become their first Top 10 chart-topper. It peaked on Billboard at the #2 spot, April 12, 1969.


Motor City Radio Flashbacks

Memories From the Soundtrack of Your Life