THIS WEEK 59 YEARS AGO: THE HOTTEST HIT IN THE USA!

NUMBER ONE IN AMERICA | MAY 5 – MAY 19, 1962

NUMBER ONE 1962

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FOURTEEN WEEKS overall on the singles chart, “Soldier Boy” by The Shirelles peaked this month at No. 01 (3 weeks) on the Billboard Hot 100. Week ending, May 5 through week-ending, May 19 1962. (Source: Billboard)

For more Billboard Number One U.S.A. Hits go HERE

 

THIS WEEK 58 YEARS AGO: THE HOTTEST HIT IN THE USA!

NUMBER ONE IN AMERICA | APRIL 27 – MAY 11, 1963

NUMBER ONE 1963

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FOURTEEN WEEKS overall on the singles chart, “I Will Follow Him” by Little Peggy March peaked this month at No. 01 (3 weeks) on the Billboard Hot 100. Week ending, April 27, through week-ending, May 11, 1963. (Source: Billboard)

For more Billboard Number One U.S.A. Hits go HERE

 

THIS WEEK 56 YEARS AGO: THE HOTTEST HIT IN THE USA!

NUMBER ONE IN AMERICA | MAY 1 – MAY 15, 1965

NUMBER ONE 1965

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ELEVEN WEEKS overall on the singles chart, “Mrs. Brown You’ve Got A Lovely Daughter” by Herman’s Hermits peaked this month at No. 01 (3 weeks) on the Billboard Hot 100. Week ending, May 1, through the week-ending, May 15 1965. (Source: Billboard)

For more Billboard Number One U.S.A. Hits go HERE

 

WHYT: DETROIT’S POWER 96 FM! THIS WEEK, MAY 4, 1987

WHYT POWER 96 FM SURVEY May 4, 1987

WHYT POWER 96 FM SURVEY May 4, 1987

 

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NUMBER ONE SINGLE

“LOOKING FOR A NEW LOVE” by JODY WATLEY | MCA

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34 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK

WEEK of MAY 4-10, 1987

 

The above WHYT chart was digitally restored by Motor City Radio Flashbacks

 

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In Memory of George Griggs

A SPECIAL THANK YOU

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A sincere, thank you, Mrs. Patti Griggs. This featured presentation would have not been possible without your generosity, dedication, and your continuous support.

Above WHYT music chart courtesy of Mrs. Patti Griggs and the George L. Griggs estate.

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A BILLBOARD COLUMBIA RECORDS ’45 AD FLASHBACK! MAY 1965

A BILLBOARD COLUMBIA RECORDS AD page rip: MAY 8, 1965

COLUMBIA RECORDS

BILLBOARD | MAY 1965

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The above Billboard (5/8/65) ad was digitally re-imaged and restored by Motor City Radio Flashbacks

 

Chad Stuart passed away on December 20, 2020. He was 79. You can view his obituary, please click HERE

A BILLBOARD WARNER BROS. ALBUMS AD FLASHBACK! MAY 1965

A BILLBOARD WARNER BROS. LPs AD page rip: MAY 8, 1965

WARNER BROS. RECORDS

BILLBOARD | MAY 1965

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The above Billboard (5/8/65) ad was digitally re-imaged and restored by Motor City Radio Flashbacks

 

THIS WEEK IN AMERICA! BILLBOARD HOT 100: MAY 9, 1964

BILLBOARD HOT 100 May 9, 1964

NUMBER ONE SINGLE IN AMERICA

 “HELLO, DOLLY!” | LOUIS ARMSTRONG |  KAPP 573

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BILLBOARD HOT 100 TABULATED BY RECORDS RETAIL SALES AND RADIO AIRPLAY

https://www.mcrfb.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/BILLBOARD-Hot-100-mcrfb2-Banner.png

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MAY 3 through MAY 9, 1964

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“Hello, Dolly!” by Louis Armstrong debuted on the Billboard singles chart at #76, for the week ending, February 15, 1964. The Armstrong single would make its eventual climb to the top — for one week only — having knocked off the Beatles’ five-week hold on the #1 spot with their hit, “Can’t Buy Me Love”, beginning May 3 through week-ending May 9.

An astounding 22 weeks on the pop singles chart, “Hello, Dolly!” dropped to #44 on its last week on Billboard, week-ending July 11, 1964.

 

** A MCRFB VIEWING TIP **

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THIS WEEK, 1964: 57 YEARS AGO! THE HOTTEST HIT IN THE U.S.A.

NUMBER 1 IN AMERICA | MAY 3-MAY 9, 1964

NUMBER ONE 1964

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TWENTY TWO WEEKS overall on the singles chart, “Hello Dolly” by Louis Armstrong peaked at #1 this week (1 week only) on the Billboard Hot 100. May 3 through week ending, May 9, 1964. (Source: Billboard)

For our previous Billboard 1964 Number One U.S.A. Hits go HERE

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MOTOWN! 50 YEARS AGO: MARVIN GAYE’S “WHAT’S GOING ON” RECALLED

“WHAT’S GOING ON”

 MARVIN GAYE | 1971

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What’s Going On” is a song by American singer-songwriter Marvin Gaye, released in 1971 on the Motown subsidiary Tamla. Originally inspired by a police brutality incident witnessed by Renaldo “Obie” Benson, the song was composed by Benson, Al Cleveland, and Gaye and produced by Gaye himself. The song marked Gaye’s departure from the Motown Sound towards more personal material. Later topping the Hot Soul Singles chart for five weeks and crossing over to number two on the Billboard Hot 100, it would sell over two million copies, becoming Gaye’s second-most successful Motown song to date.

The song’s inspiration came from Renaldo “Obie” Benson, a member of the Motown vocal group the Four Tops, after he and the group’s tour bus arrived at Berkeley on May 15, 1969. While there, Benson witnessed police brutality and violence in the city’s People’s Park during a protest held by anti-war activists in what was hailed later as “Bloody Thursday”. Upset by the situation, Benson said to author Ben Edmonds that as he saw this, he asked, “What is happening here?’ One question led to another. Why are they sending kids so far away from their families overseas? Why are they attacking their own children in the streets?”

Upset, he discussed what he witnessed with friend and songwriter Al Cleveland, who in turn wrote and composed a song to reflect Benson’s concerns. Benson wanted to give the song to his group but the other Four Tops turned down the request. “My partners told me it was a protest song”, Benson said later, “I said ‘no man, it’s a love song, about love and understanding. I’m not protesting, I want to know what’s going on.” In 1970, Benson presented the untitled song to Marvin Gaye, who added a new melody and revised the song to his liking, adding in his own lyrics. Benson later said Gaye tweaked and enriched the song, “added some things that were more ghetto, more natural, which made it seem like a story than a song . . . we measured him for the suit and he tailored the hell out of it.”Gaye titled it “What’s Going On”. When Gaye initially thought the song’s moody feel would be appropriate to be recorded by The Originals, Benson convinced Gaye to record it as his own song.

Gaye entered the recording studio, Hitsville USA, on June 1, 1970 to record “What’s Going On“. Instead of relying on other producers to help him with the song, Gaye, inspired by recent successes of his productions for the vocal act, The Originals, decided to produce the song himself, mixing up original Motown in-house studio musicians such as James Jamerson and Eddie Brown with musicians he recruited himself. The opening soprano saxophone line, provided by musician Eli Fontaine, was not originally intended. Once Gaye heard Fontaine’s riff, he told Fontaine to go home. When Fontaine protested that he was just “goofing around“, Gaye replied, “you goof off exquisitely, thank you.” The laid-back atmosphere in the studio was brought on by constant marijuana smoking by Gaye and other musicians.

Jamerson was pulled into the session after Gaye located him playing with a band at a local bar. Respected Motown arranger and conductor David Van De Pitte said later to Ben Edmonds that Jamerson “always kept a bottle of [the Greek spirit] Metaxa in his bass case. He could really put that stuff away, and then sit down and still be able to play. His tolerance was incredible. It took a hell a lot to get him smashed.” The night Jamerson entered the studio to record the bass lines to the song, Jamerson could not sit properly in his seat and, according to one of the members of the Funk Brothers, laid on the floor playing his bass riffs. De Pitte recalled that it was a track that Jamerson greatly respected: “On ‘What’s Going On’ though, he just read the [bass] part down like I wrote it. He loved it because I had written Jamerson licks for Jamerson.” Annie Jamerson recalls that when he returned home that night, he declared that the song they had been working on was a ‘masterpiece’, one of the few occasions where he had discussed his work so passionately with her. Gaye also added his own instrumentation, playing piano and keyboards while also playing a box drum to help accentuate Chet Forest‘s drumming.

To add more to the song’s laid-back approach, Gaye invited the Detroit Lions players Mel Farr and Lem Barney to the studio and, along with Gaye and the Funk Brothers, added in vocal chatter, engaging in a mock conversation. Musician and songwriter Elgie Stover, who later served as a caterer for Bill Clinton and was then a Motown staffer and confidante of Gaye’s, was the man who opened the song’s track with the words, “hey, man, what’s happening?” and “everything is everything”. Later Gaye brought Lem Barney and Mel Farr as well as Bobby Rogers of The Miracles to record the song’s background vocal track. The rhythm tracks and the song’s overdubs were done at Hitsville, while strings, horns, lead and background vocals were recorded at Golden World Studios.

On hearing a playback of the song, Gaye asked his engineer Kenneth Sands to give him his two vocal leads to compare what he wanted to use for the song’s release. Sands ended up mixing the leads together, by accident. However, when he heard it, Gaye was so impressed with the double-lead feel that he kept it, influencing his later recordings where he mastered vocal multi-layering adding in three different vocal parts. Before presenting the song to Gordy, he produced a false fade to the song, bringing the song back for a few seconds after it was initially to have ended. The song was also notable for its use of major seventh and minor seventh chords, which was a fairly uncommon use at the time Gaye recorded the song’s b-side, “God Is Love“, on the same day.

When Berry Gordy heard the song after Gaye presented the song to him in California, he turned down Gaye’s request to release it, telling Gaye he felt it was “the worst thing I ever heard in my life“. When Harry Balk requested the song to be released, Gordy told him the song featured “that Dizzy Gillespie stuff in the middle, that scatting, it’s old“. Gaye responded to this rejection by refusing to record material unless the song would be released, going on strike until, he felt, Gordy saw sense in releasing it.

RELEASED IN MAY 1971, ‘What’s Going On’ was Gaye’s 11th album he recorded and was his first album he was sole credited, having produced for the Tamla label.

Anxious for Marvin Gaye product, Balk got Motown’s sales vice president Barney Ales to release the song, releasing it on January 17, 1971, pressing 100,000 copies of the song and promoting the single to radio stations across the country. The initial success of this led to a further 100,000 to reach demand, selling over 200,000 copies within a week. The song was issued without Gordy’s knowledge. The song eventually became a huge success, reaching the top of the charts within a month in March of the year, staying at number-one for five weeks on the Billboard R&B charts and one week at number-one on the Cashbox pop chart. On the Billboard Hot 100, it reached number two, behind both “Just My Imagination (Running Away with Me)” by The Temptations and “Joy to the World” by Three Dog Night. Billboard ranked it as the No. 21 song for 1971. The song eventually sold more than two million copies, becoming then the fastest-selling Motown single at the time. The song’s success forced Gordy to allow Gaye to produce his own music, giving him an ultimatum to complete an album by the end of March, later resulting in the What’s Going On album itself.

“What’s Going On” was nominated for two Grammy Awards in 1972 including Best Male R&B Vocal Performance and Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s), but failed to win in any of the categories.

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PERSONNEL

Lead vocals by Marvin Gaye. Background vocals by Marvin Gaye and The Originals

Spoken interlude by Marvin Gaye, Mel Farr, Lem Barney, Elgie Stover, Kenneth Stover, Bobby Rogers, and the Funk Brothers.

Written by Renaldo “Obie” Benson, Al Cleveland, and Marvin Gaye

Produced by Marvin Gaye

Instrumentation by The Funk Brothers, The Detroit Symphony Orchestra and Marvin Gaye (piano and box drum)

Arranged by David Van De Pitte

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Information source: “What’s Going On” Wikipedia

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MARVIN GAYE April 1971 (photo credit: Jim Hendin)

WHAT’S GOING ON (acapella)

DETROIT MOTOWN MONDAY! MARVIN GAYE MOTOWN CLASSIC: 1971

—MARVIN GAYE—

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Released February 20, “What’s Going On” peaked at #1 (5 weeks; charted 15 total weeks R&B overall) on the Billboard R&B chart in 1971. B-side: “God Is Love”

TAMLA 54201 (Source: Billboard Top R&B Singles)