Motor City Radio Flashbacks

Memories From the Soundtrack of Your Life

THIS WEEK 50 YEARS AGO: THE HOTTEST HIT IN THE USA!

May 31st, 2017


NUMBER 1 IN AMERICA ’67 * Aretha Franklin * 05/28/67 – 06/10/1967

BILLBOARD HOT 100 TOP FIVE: WEEK-ENDING JUNE 3, 1967

(click on chart image 2x for detailed view)


NUMBER ONE FOR 1967!

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THIRTEEN WEEKS on the singles chart, “Respect” by Aretha Franklin peaked this week at No. 01 (2 weeks) on the Billboard Hot 100, week May 28 through June 10, 1967(source: Billboard)

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MCRFB Link: For the previous No. 1 record in the U.S.A. 1967 GO HERE.



WKNR DETROIT RADIO: ’65 NEWSPAPER AD FLASHBACK

May 30th, 2017


Monday, May 17, 1965

A DETROIT RADIO BACK-PAGE AD

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DETROIT FREE PRESS: “New On WKNR”

(Above WKNR ad courtesy freep.com newspapers archive. Copyright 2017; Newspapers.com).



Thursday, May 20, 1965

A DETROIT RADIO BACK-PAGE AD

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DETROIT FREE PRESS: “’R’ Is For Regen”

(Above WKNR ad courtesy freep.com newspapers archive. Copyright 2017; Newspapers.com).


A MCRFB Viewing Tip: On your PC? For a larger detailed view click image 2x and open to second window. Click image anytime to return to NORMAL image size.

Click your server’s back button to return to MCRFB home page.


On your mobile device? Tap on image. Open to second window. “Stretch” across the featured image on your device screen to magnify for larger print view.

Missed any previous ‘Detroit Radio Back-Pages’ features? GO HERE.


A DETROIT WKNR-AM 13 NEWSPAPER 1966 FLASHBACK

May 30th, 2017


Monday, October 17, 1966

A DETROIT RADIO BACK-PAGE

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DETROIT FREE PRESS: WKNR-AM ‘Scott Regen: Sort Of ‘Hipburger” ’ 

(Above WKNR related article is courtesy freep.com newspaper archive. Copyright 2017. Newspapers.com).

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A MCRFB Viewing Tip: On your PC? You can read the entire 1966 WKNR article! For a larger detailed view click above image 2x and open to second window. Click image anytime to return to NORMAL image size.

Click your server’s back button to return to MCRFB.COM home page.


On your mobile device? Tap on image. Open to second window. “Stretch” across the featured image on your device screen to magnify for larger print view.


Missed any previous ‘Detroit Radio Back-Pages’ features? GO HERE.



WKNR-AM BACK ON THE RADIO: SCOTT REGEN!

May 30th, 2017

WKNR RECALLED ON MOTOR CITY RADIO FLASHBACKS

WKNR-AM 1310 * 1967 * SCOTT REGEN

Scott Regen WKNR aircheck date: Friday, May 12, 1967

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NEW! Special THANKS to Mike Lockhart, Ferndale, Michigan, for recently donating this WKNR radio aircheck to Motor City Radio Flashbacks!

The Mike Lockhart Collection


THIS MEMORIAL DAY. REMEMBERING ALL WHO SERVED

May 29th, 2017
Steve Allen Smith Great Lakes Memorial Cemetary, Holly, MI

IN REMEMBRANCE


IN OBSERVANCE. A LEE ALAN MEMORIAL DAY SPECIAL

May 29th, 2017

MEMORIAL DAY * Lee Alan * LEE ALAN CREATIVE PRODUCTIONS

MCRFB.COM Logo (2)

IN REMEMBRANCE OF SWINGIN’ SWEENEY. 05/25/2017

May 26th, 2017

* Frank ” Swingin’ ” Sweeney *

IN MEMORY

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Late last night, Motor City Radio Flashbacks received sad word Frank “Swingin'” Sweeney passed away, yesterday, May 25, in New York City. He was 83.

In tribute to the WKNR legacy of Frank Sweeney please visit Keener13 com.Remembering “Swingin'” Sweeney

On October 31, 2013, Frank Sweeney reflects his memories of WKNR for the 50th year on the birth of Keener 13. You can listen to Frank Sweeney (audio @ 10:09 to 16:13) in this Motor City Radio Flashbacks aircheck HERE.

Photo: Frank Sweeney with Gary Stevens, Novi, MI., April 25, 1998


IN REMEMBRANCE OF TED CLARK. DECEMBER 25, 2015

May 26th, 2017

* Ted Clark *

IN MEMORY

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In February of this year, Motor City Radio Flashbacks received word, having been confirmed by his daughter, Patricia, from Illinois, Ted Clark (real name Alva Phillips) passed away on December 25, 2015. He was 84.

For more on the WKNR legacy of Ted Clark visit keener13.com.


RADIOMEN MAP CLEAN-UP BATTLE VS DIRTY RECORDS . . . APRIL 8, 1967

May 25th, 2017

From the MCRFB NEWS Archive: 1967

Broadcasters To Hold Private Session Amid National Association of Broadcasters Meet April 2-5

 

 

 

 

CHICAGO – Broadcasters will hold private meetings here Sunday to Wednesday (April 2 -5) during the National Association of Broadcasters‘ convention seeking some method of eliminating or censoring pornographic lyrics on records.

At present, two different factions are working on the same objective. One is headed by the McLendon Stations, who are calling for printed lyrics of both sides of every record submitted to their six music stations. The chain will refuse to play records sent without lyric sheets and refuse consideration of both sides of a record if one side is considered in bad taste.

This would have hurt “Ruby Tuesday” by the Rolling Stones, a big hit, because the flip side “Let’s Spend the Night Together” stirred up a national fuss.

The other radio faction is being headed by Harry Availl, general manager of WEAM in Washington. He said he had “half a dozen” stations lined up who have expressed strong interest in some method of avoiding the “dirty lyric” problem.

Averill said he will be meeting (no official connection with the NAB convention) with other station managers at the NAB to “formulate and pursue aggressively some system” of control.

He, too, wants to see lyrics. “Today, the records have to be watched very carefully,” he said. “We don’t want to be involved in any restraint of trade situation, so we’ll also be discussing this matter with our lawyers. But I think all the better operators in the top 25 markets will be involved in our campaign.”

Recently, several stations have refused to play records featuring even a suggestion of bad taste. One Hot 100 format station recently taped backward a possible suggestive line so listeners wouldn’t understand it on the air. END

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(Information and news source: Billboard; April; 8, 1967)



ANTI-SMUT MCLENDON TO SET UP A ‘FRINGE’ PANEL . . . MAY 20, 1967

May 25th, 2017

From the MCRFB NEWS archive: 1967

Gordon McLendon “Lyric-Seeking” Panel Seek To Weed Out Suggestive Records

 

 

 

 

NEW YORKGordon McLendon, president of the McLendon radio chain, is going to set up a lyric-testing panel of “prostitutes, ex-prostitutes, junkies and ex-addicts” to assist in weeding out suggestive records. This is the latest declaration McLendon has made in his campaign against “filth” in the music-record industry.

The chain has set May 15 (this was published in an April 8 Billboard advertisement) as the deadline by which all record companies will have to provide printed lyrics with new records or stand the risk of not having them played on the air. McLendon is seeking to carry this campaign to every radio station in the nation and, so far, is riding a groundswell of enthusiasm, especially at the grassroots level, but also from major stations and broadcasting chains.

The success of the nationwide purge, he admitted in an exclusive interview, “depends on the support of other radio stations throughout the country. If joined by other important stations – and some have already joined – then the irresponsible element of the record industry we’re concerned about will have to co-operate.”

But, regardless, the current wave of records featuring sex-suggestive lyrics or lyrics pushing dope brought him to the point “where I couldn’t live with myself. Not because I was aware of doing anything wrong, but because I felt we were not policing the music satisfactorily.” McLendon said that his national program director, Bill Stewart, had suggested attempting to interest the radio industry in a voluntary crusade.

To combat “hippy” phrases in many of the lyrics in question on today’s records. McLendon last Saturday began work on his unusual lyric-testing panel –“five to seven people of different backgrounds, maybe a prostitute, an ex-prostitute, a junkie, an ex-addict.”

On any lyric found difficult to understand, he said the chain would telephone one of the panel members and read the lyric to them. “Best we can do, then, is say the lyrics are probably all right if they pass our informal jury.”

Questioned about the possibility of providing a “dictionary of hip slang” to his stations – which include KLIF in Dallas, WYSL in Buffalo, N. Y., and KILT in Houston – McLendon felt this would not help because teen slang changes so rapidly, “almost by the week.”

Moral Obligation

But he felt a moral responsibility to do something constructive and do it quick. “I’ve just come back from Sweden and they are having a serious problem with marijuana.” Use of marijuana is common, he said, even at the 8 and 9-year old level. It’s a “desperate situation.”

He said he didn’t want to pose as an authority on marijuana, “because I’m not, But it is the first step toward the really hard stuff.” He felt this allegory could be also put forth toward smutty records; “maybe this will be the first breakdown for the morals of teens and sub-teens in the United States.” Kids, he felt, begin their really first contact with the adult world through listening to radio and watching youth shows on TV. If this first contact makes drugs and illicit sex attractive, “we’ve been just as guilty as those who do the pushing of drugs. I feel very strongly about this.”

How strongly is evident by the fact that he taped a Mike Wallace show last Wednesday attacking dirty lyrics and earlier that day delivered a speech before the national convention of the American Mothers Committee at the Waldorf- Astoria here, in which he said, “The McLendon radio stations will not air records that offend public morals, dignity or taste either innocently or intentionally. We’ve had all we can stand of the record industry’s glorifying marijuana, LSD, and sexual activity. The newest Beatles record, out next week, has a line of 40,000 purple  hearts in one arm. Is that what you want your children to listen to? I certainly don’t think so.”

One of the new songs mentioned in his speech was “Try It,” by The Standells. McLendon urged members: “When you go back to your own communities, let your radio stations know that you are behind this campaign.” He called for “a rather updated version of the Boston Tea Party. Two centuries later, now, I suppose we might call it The Wax Party – one in which we urge all the distasteful English records that deal with sex, sin and drugs (this is not to say the British music or record industry is the only offender).

At the same time, I think it is past the time that we made an attempt to stop whatever few irresponsible elements of the British music and record industry there are in existence from influencing our children with their double ententes and, in some instances, single ententes of unmistakable meaning.”

On the Mike Wallace show, McLendon said, “I think we’re going to get badly hurt by this stand because we’re never going to know from what direction the attacks will be coming. It’s unfortunate that a great deal of the opposition will be like germ warfare, because you could scarcely expect the people to come out and insist they be given the right to continue recording filth.”

He told Billboard that, “I’ve got to ban these records … or be called a liar by the radio industry.” Quite a number of the records the station would be banning, he said, might get played on other radio stations and be high on their charts. He said that McLendon stations might even suffer in ratings because of not playing these records. “Being a practical businessman, I had to think of this. But I said, ‘Let her rip!’ and that’s what we are going to do.” For six months or more to come, he felt the broadcasting chain would find all types of bugs in policing the music and “some elements of the standards we’ve so pragmatically set will have to change, but I think this is, at least, the beginning of what could be something very, very good. We’re going to be working on this.” END

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(Information and news source: Billboard; May 20, 1967)


TWO TOP RADIO EXECUTIVES. Don Burden with Gordon McLendon (R) in this press photo from 1967. (Click on images for largest view)


Motor City Radio Flashbacks

Memories From the Soundtrack of Your Life